Liz.Carter at aya dot yale dot edu 

© 2017 Elizabeth Carter

Autism Research

 

I examined whether children with autism process social signals similarly to children with typical development using interactive avatars and neuroimaging. 

Are Children with Autism More Responsive To Animated Characters?

Children with autism do not prefer to interact with a cartoon over a human therapist. 

 

Carter, E.J., Hyde, J., Williams, D.L., & Hodgins, J.K. (Accepted). Investigating the influence of avatar facial characteristics on the social behaviors of children with autism. Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, San Jose, May 2016.

 

Carter, E.J., Williams, D.L., Hodgins, J.K., & Lehman, J.F. (2014). Are children with autism more responsive to animated characters? A study of interactions with humans and human-controlled avatars. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 44(10), 2475-2485. (link)

Literature Reviews and Commentaries

Carter, E.J., & Hyde, J. (2015). Designing autism research for maximum impact. Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Seoul, April 2015.

 

Pelphrey, K. A., & Carter, E. J. (2008). Charting the typical and atypical development of the social brain. Development and Psychopathology, 20(04), 1081-1102. (link)

 

Pelphrey, K. A., & Carter, E. J. (2010). Brain mechanisms underlying social perception deficits in autism. Human Behavior, Learning, and the Developing Brain: Atypical Development, 56.

Brain Mechanisms for Social Perception in Autism

Children with autism may not automatically perform linguistic encoding when making social judgments. 

 

Carter, E. J., Williams, D. L., Minshew, N. J., & Lehman, J. F. (2012). Is he being bad? Social and language brain networks during social judgment in children with autism. PloS ONE, 7(10), e47241. (link)

 

Children with autism show reduced pSTS specificity to biological motion than children with typical development.

 

Pelphrey, K. A., & Carter, E. J. (2008). Brain mechanisms for social perception. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1145(1), 283-299. (link)